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Chiusdino Geothermal Plant, Italy

Chiusdino Geothermal Plant, Italy

In operation

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The plant

Chiusdino Geothermal Plant

The municipalities of Chiusdino, Pomarance and Castelnuovo Val di Cecina form Tuscany’s historical triangle when it comes to harnessing geothermal energy, a practice that dates back thousands of years. The Chiusdino Power Plant was built in 2011 and has a 20-MW turboalternator unit that can generate up to 150 million kWh of energy per year, saving around 31,000 metric tons of oil equivalent (toe). The turbine is powered by approximately 130 T/h of geothermal steam originating from four wells nearby. The plant is an example of excellence in terms of both environmental integration and technological innovation. 

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Technology

Geothermal

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Status

In operation

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Operational capacity

18.5 MW

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Energy production

133.4 GWh (Net Energy 2021)

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CO2 emissions avoided

56.9 kton (Enerdata Coefficient, Sept. 2021: 426.64 ton/GWh)

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Energy needs met

Over 1,200 families in Tuscany

Timeline

Milestones

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Impact on local communities

The power plant and the entire program for drilling wells and steam-pipes are the result of a participatory process. It involved local institutions and communities to foster the development of the geothermal energy sector with modern techniques that can ensure people’s health and full respect of the environment.

It is a sustainable plant: it reuses materials, recycles waste, recovers and recirculates oils, among other things.

The district heating system for the town of Chiusdino was completed in 2019. It uses geothermal steam to heat homes, shops and craft workshops, without all the emissions of CO2 and fine particulate matter that are generated by boilers and stoves.

Alongside the power plant, we’ve also promoted an experimental project to cultivate spirulina algae in collaboration with Co.Svi.G (Italy’s Consortium for the Development of Geothermal Areas) and the University of Florence. The project uses geothermal heat and carbon-free CO2, opening up important prospects for the industrial development of this sector. Basil, tomatoes and flowers are also grown locally in geothermal greenhouses.

Contacts

Italy

Business development

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